Review: The November Girl, by Lydia Kang

If any book has a unique premise, this is it. I picked it up completely blind, not having read the blurb beforehand, and the result was a whole lot of confusion that still managed to hook me and keep me wanting to know more until the end: a testament to Lydia Kang’s writing skills. As…

Review: Dogs of War, by Adrian Tchaikovsky

This is a pretty stellar work of speculative fiction: heartbreaking, thought provoking and very unusual in the way that it’s written and executed. As a piece of sci fi, it’s great. As a book that delves into everything from company- and human- exploitation to ethics and morality, as well as what it means to be…

Review: The Bear and the Nightingale, by Katherine Arden

This book is by turns haunting, bewitching and very lyrical, combing fairytale with Russian folklore to create something that I had trouble putting down. In short, it’s wonderful. Katherine Arden draws deeply on her background in Russian studies here to make something utterly unique. The setting is a fantasy version of medieval Russia, where Vasilisa,…

Review: Weaver’s Lament, by Emma Newman

This story is definitely a niche one, but none the less compelling for it! It’s by Emma Newman, the queen of short stories and generally excellent writing, following on from the first book in her Industrial Magic series, Brother’s Ruin. The era is the 1800’s, a Victorian England with magic and magi who hold the…